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Patient Safety

A Balancing Act: Managing Pain and Preventing Medication Misuse

Nina Cimino, Pharm.D.
Baltimore, Maryland

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-455-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU, no partial credit)

This activity will provide an overview of medications used in pain management, with a focus on promoting safety. The role of different classes of pain medications and their adverse effects will be discussed. Principles for the safe use of pain medications and risk mitigation strategies will also be reviewed.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify and describe three different types of drugs used for pain management, including non-opioids, opioids, and adjuvant medications.
  • Describe abuse deterrent features of pain medications and identify medications containing these features.
  • Identify at least three risk factors for opioid misuse.
  • Describe strategies technicians can use to help pharmacists mitigate the risks of opioid therapy in pain management.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Key Strategies for Improving Medication Safety: An ISMP Perspective for 2015

Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph., M.S., FASHP
President
Institute for Safe Medication Practices

Darryl S. Rich, Pharm.D., M.B.A., FASHP
Medication Safety Specialist
Institute for Safe Medication Practices

Christina Michalek, B.Sc.Pharm, FASHP
Medication Safety Specialist
Insitute for Safe Medication Practices

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-274-H05-T
2 hours (0.2 CEU)

This activity will provide an overview of the most important medication safety issues reported to ISMP in 2015. Pharmacy technicians will also learn about effective strategies to reduce medication errors related to sterile compounding, the ISMP Guidelines for the Safe Preparation of Sterile Compounds, and key elements of the new ISMP guidelines related to IV push administration of medications.

Learning Objectives

  • List the top five most important medication safety issues reported to ISMP in the past 12 months.
  • Describe the most implemented, and least implemented best practices from the 2014-15 ISMP Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices in Hospitals, and the new best practices for 2016-17 ISMP Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices in Hospitals.
  • Describe at least three effective strategies to reduce medication errors related to sterile compounding.
  • Describe the changes to the ISMP Guidelines for the Safe Preparation of Sterile Compounds and key elements of the new ISMP guidelines related to IV push administration of medications.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Medication Errors: Causes and Prevention

John B. Hertig, Pharm.D., M.S.
Associate Director and Assistant Clinical Professor
Purdue University College of Pharmacy's Center for Medication Safety Advancement
Indianapolis, Indiana

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-13-426-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Preventing medication errors requires a team approach in health care. This activity will review the types and causes of medication errors throughout the medication use system. Pharmacy technicians will learn strategies for preventing common medication errors, as well as processes for reporting medication errors including when, what, and to whom to report.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe common types of medication errors and identify factors that contribute to these errors.
  • Explain strategies for preventing common medication errors.
  • Outline processes and procedures for reporting medication errors, including when and what to report, and to whom should reporting occur.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Medication Safety in Oncology: Role of the Technician

Courtney Yuen, Pharm.D., BCOP
Oncology Pharmacy Manager
UCSF Medical Center
San Francisco, California

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-453-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This educational program is designed to teach pharmacy technicians about medication error prevention in oncology. We will review common areas of oncology errors covering including both oral and intravenous regimens.

ASHP and ISMP recommendations for safe handling and compounding of hazardous drugs will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • List the area where medication errors occurs most frequently in the oncology setting.
  • Describe the different risk factors associated with oral chemotherapy medication safety.
  • List ways the technician can help decrease the risk of medication error during sterile compounding.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Pharmacy Technician's Role in Pediatric Medication Safety

Sheila Pedigo, Pharm.D., BCPS
Pediatric Clinical Specialist
Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity #0204-0000-13-439-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Preparing medications for pediatric patients is more complicated than preparing medications for adults. Doses usually must be calculated and most medications are not available in required doses. In addition, pediatric patients vary greatly in size and weight. This educational activity will identify the ages and drugs most associated with medication errors. Additionally, faculty will review reasons that children are predisposed to medication errors and describe technology systems which minimize medication errors. Strategies that pharmacy technicians should implement in their practice to enhance pediatric medication safety will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify pediatric ages and drugs associated with medication errors.
  • Describe reasons children are predisposed to medication errors.
  • List pharmacy technology systems which minimize medication errors.
  • List strategies technicians should implement to enhance pediatric medication safety.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Preventing Errors Associated with High-Alert Medications

Donna Horn, B.S.Pharm., D.Ph.
Director, Patient Safety - Community Pharmacy
Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Horsham, Pennsylvania

ACPE activity #0204-0000-13-428-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will review the history and frequency of medication errors, using case examples of reported errors from high-alert medications. Pharmacy technicians will learn about high-alert medications in both the acute care and ambulatory care practice settings, as well as best practices for preventing errors associated with these medications.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Review the history and frequency of medication errors.
  • Discuss the multi-factorial nature of medication errors.
  • Cite examples of errors that occur with high-alert medications
  • Identify recommendations to prevent errors associated with high-alert medications
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Safe Medication Practices in an Aging Population

Michelle Fritsch, Pharm.D., CGP, BCACP
President
Meds MASH, LLC
Monkton, Maryland
ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-418-L05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

The population is aging with the largest generation now nearing or over age 65. Medication regimens can be especially complex for this patient population. For elderly patients, medications are often involved in the event that takes patients from being completely active and autonomous to needing regular care. Learn about the most common medications to monitor and how to protect patients from medication-related events.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe how medications impact senior adults differently than younger counterparts.
  • Explain the common medications contributing to falls, negative cardiovascular events, strokes, and other life-altering events.
  • Describe why medication regimens are often complicated and strategies to reduce risks of complex regimens.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

The Great Safety Debate
ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-105-H05-T
1.5 hours (0.1.5 CEU)

See history unfold at the first Great Safety Debate. During this live broadcast from the ASHP Summer Meetings in Baltimore, specialists from across the country will meet on stage for a lively debate of top safety concerns moderated by Sean Cudahy, NBC News Charlottesville.

Learning Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the best practices with Insulin safety: Pen vs. vial.
  • Distinguish the risk/benefit of Independent Double Checks: Pro or Con as a safety measure.
  • Determine if TALL man lettering is a help or hindrance.
  • Moderator:
    • Sean Cudahy, B.A. Reporter & Anchor, WVIR TV NBC29, Charlottesville, Virginia, Herndon, Virginia
  • Panelists:
    • Gregory P. Burger, Pharm.D., CPPS Medication Safety Coordinator, Stormont-Vail Health, Lecompton, Kansas
    • Rosemary Call, Pharm.D., BCPS Medication Safety Officer, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
    • Michael Cohen, R.Ph., M.S., Sc.D. (hon), DPS (hon), FASHP President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices, Horsham, Pennsylvania
    • Michael C. Dejos, Pharm.D., BCPS Medication Safety Officer, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware
    • Natasha Nicol, Pharm.D., FASHP Director of Global Patient Safety Affairs, Cardinal Health, Pawleys Island, South Carolina
    • Christopher M. Patty, D.N.P., RN, CPPS Medication Safety Specialist, Kaweah Delta Health Care District, Visalia, California
    • Nancy Rampe, Pharm.D. Pharmacy Manager, St. Rita's Medical Center, Kalida, Ohio
    • Meghan M. Rowcliffe, Pharm.D., BCPS Pediatric Medication Safety Officer, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, Hanover, Maryland
    • Linda M. Spooner, Pharm.D., BCPS (AQ-ID), FASHP Professor of Pharmacy Practice, MCPHS University School of Pharmacy-Worcester/Manchester, Worcester, Massachusetts
  • On-Demand

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The Joint Commission is Coming! What Do I Do?

Jeannell Mansur, Pharm.D., FASHP, FMSMO, CJCP
Practice Leader, Medication Safety
Joint Commission Resources
Joint Commission International
Oak Brook, Illinois

ACPE activity #0204-0000-15-416-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

A successful survey by the Joint Commission is a goal for all healthcare organizations who use this process for accreditation by the Joint Commission and/or certification by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Founded in 1951, The Joint Commission evaluates and accredits more than 20,500 health care organizations and programs in the United States. To earn and maintain The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval™, an organization undergoes an on-site survey by a Joint Commission survey team at least every three years. This presentation will describe the purpose of the Joint Commission survey, how organizations will prepare for survey and what role the pharmacy technician may play, as well as what happens during the survey and how the pharmacy technician may be involved.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the purpose of the accreditation process and the implications of failure to meet Joint Commission standards.
  • List three areas in which the pharmacy technician may assist the healthcare organization in its preparation for survey.
  • Identify three common medication-related findings during Joint Commission surveys.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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