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Compounding Sterile Preparations

Aseptic Technique and Sterile Compounding Procedures: Focus on the Basics

Angela T. Cassano, Pharm.D., BCPS, FASHP
President, Pharmfusion Consulting, LLC
Midlothian, Virginia

ACPE activity #0204-0000-13-421-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Aseptic technique is critical to patient safety and all personnel involved with sterile compounding should be aware of the proper processes and procedures. This activity focuses on the basics of garbing, handwashing, cleaning of work areas, as well as identification of critical sites and causes of contamination. Pharmacy technicians will learn about common items used in sterile compounding and how to respect the elements of aseptic technique to keep our patients safe.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe aseptic technique for preparing compounded sterile products (CSPs).
  • Explain proper procedures for hand washing, garbing, and cleaning work spaces.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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Extemporaneous Compounding of Nonsterile Preparations, Part I

J. Tyler Stevens, Pharm.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Pharmacy
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-13-463-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Patients regularly rely on the pharmacy team to compound dosage forms that are not commercially available. Whether it is an ointment, cream, solution, or another non-sterile formulation, compounding provides options for patients needing specialized doses or dosage forms to receive therapy. One common conundrum solved by compounding is the provision of a liquid formulation of a medication made from a tablet or capsule for a pediatric patient who can't swallow solid dosage forms.

This program will focus on providing guidance for pharmacy technicians involved in non-sterile compounding in a variety of pharmacy practice settings. To provide compounded medications, the pharmacy team must have a solid understanding of the processes, procedures and equipment needed to prepare these formulations. Knowledge of calculations and how to apply them to compounding help to ensure correct proportions are used to make the final product. A highlight of the program will be the inclusion of practical examples that may be encountered in the pharmacy.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants should be able to

  • Discuss the history of extemporaneous compounding and review the role of USP 795.
  • Identify at least three pieces of compounding equipment and explain their uses.
  • Compare various pharmaceutical dosage forms and summarize proper techniques for compounding these nonsterile products.
  • Perform appropriate calculations necessary for compounding nonsterile products.
  • On-Demand

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Extemporaneous Compounding of Nonsterile Preparations, Part II

J. Tyler Stevens, Pharm.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Pharmacy
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-442-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This continuing education activity will highlight techniques and skills pharmacy technicians need to prepare various dosage forms which are not commercially-available to the patient. Part II of this series focuses on preparing divided (mixed) powders and capsules. Both pharmacists and pharmacy technicians must apply accurate calculations, methods, and procedures to ensure a safe and effective final product. Practical examples that may be encountered in the pharmacy will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the standards for compounding in USP Chapter <795>
  • Compare various pharmaceutical dosage forms (divided powders and capsules) and summarize proper techniques for compounding these nonsterile products.
  • Explain appropriate packaging and labeling for each of the nonsterile products discussed.
  • Apply appropriate calculations necessary for compounding nonsterile products.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

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The Facts About High Risk Compounding

Eric S. Kastango, M.B.A., B.S.Pharm., FASHP
President/CEO
Clinical IQ, LLC
Madison, New Jersey

ACPE activity #0204-0000-13-461-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacy technicians are an integral part of the sterile compounding process and are regularly responsible for preparation of compounded sterile products (CSPs). High risk compounded sterile products (CSPs) are often made from non-sterile components and require sterilization prior to administration to patients. According to USP Chapter <797> standards, additional quality assurance processes are required for compounding environments, procedures, and personnel involved in preparing high risk CSPs. Sterilization techniques and sterility testing requirements are complex procedures and require proper training and competency assessment.

Learning Objectives
After participating in this knowledge-based educational activity, participants should be able to

  • Describe USP Chapter <797> standards for high risk level compounding.
  • Explain the elements of the quality assurance requirements for high risk compounding including components, procedures, facility requirements, personnel requirements and qualifications.
  • Differentiate between the types of sterilization methods.
  • Describe quality release testing of high risk level CSPs.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph

For Subscribers, Log In for CE Activities